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Maha Shivaratri-The one that takes place in the last month of Maagha, Amanta (Amavasya), is called Maha+Shivaratri

Maha Shivaratri
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Shiva+ratri translates to “Shiva’s night.” Every month, on the fourteenth day of the “Krishna Paksha,” or the Moon’s descending fortnight, it takes place. The one that takes place in the last month of Maagha, Amanta (Amavasya), is called Maha+Shivaratri, which means significant Shivaratris.

The wedding day of Shiva and Parvati is known as Maha Shivaratri.
Shiva had a happy existence as a Grihasti (householder) after being married to Daksha’s daughter Sati. Sati was forced to visit them without being invited, nevertheless, by the Yagya at their home. Sati ate herself alive when she heard her spouse humiliated in absentia.
After the Daksha Yagya was fiercely destroyed, Shiva became thoughtful and meditative.
When the “Kama Dahana” occurred, Sati reincarnated as Parvati to Himavanta and wed Shiva.

Shiva is a model householder who adeptly handles contradictions. His name is Shubhīm, which signifies auspiciousness. Shiva is shown as riding the bull Nandi, according to the concept of “Vahana,” or the mobility. Riding a lion is Mother Parvati. Anura, the mouse, is the vahana of their older son. Snakes eat rats, and Shiva wears snakes on his body. The Mayura (Peacock), the vahana of their second son Kartika, consumes snakes. Shiva is shown as being pensive, although he is also able to dance energetically, or in a “Tandava.” Despite having everything, he gave it all to Kubera at his request. Shiva is a very giving person; upon Ravana’s request, he even gave away his entire self, the Atma Linga. His simplicity is also evident in the worship style. Shiva is referred to as “Abhisheka Priya,” or the one who is satisfied with water being poured (ablution).
Shiva temples are almost completely devoid of ornamentation; in fact, the offering is only Bilva leaves. Shiva’s mantra, panchakshari (five letters), is composed of five powerful beejas. The Panchakshari embodies each of the five components known as the “Pancha+bhutas.” The initial letter of the word “Na” (Nabha) stands for the sky. The second letter, “Ma,” comes from Mars, the element of wind and air. “Shi” is derived from the Shikhi fire element. The elements of water and earth are represented by the final two Beejas. Each of the aforementioned Bhutas is represented by one of Shiva’s five faces. There is a way in the tradition to enhance and add to Panchakshari by having Mother Goddess Beeja conduct the japa at the beginning. This appropriately represents the “Artha-Nareeshwara.”

Abhishek Verma

 

 

 

 


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